501c3 grant money

Ellisa Sun cuts out her heart and leaves it on the stage — which is why she never wears white. Currently on her first national tour, Ellisa is showing she has what it takes to make it on her own. Just a guitar, a 30-foot RV, and an insatiable desire to perform. Raised in Los Angeles and (until recently) based in the San Francisco Bay Area, her sound is honest, heartfelt, and textured, combining elements of jazz, soul, and pop.

This course covers quite a bit of ground. It starts with some Ableton basics, and then moves through important concepts like velocity, variation, and sound design, closing out with an intro to advanced techniques. Robin was a remarkable student who came into the course pretty new to Ableton and ended up creating this awesome, professional-sounding track. There are so many cool elements at play here. It’s a really nice blend of variety and cohesion from start to finish. Check it out, but be warned that you may end up leaving it on repeat.

Hungry for music charity rating

I mostly approached this as “soloing” with the a cappella, using the instrumental as my “rhythm section.” But I did some improvising with the instrumental too, by looping, and by jumping around between cue points. I don’t consider this to be a polished work of art or anything, but I discovered some pretty cool sounds, even at my basic skill level. So I’m excited to see where this leads.

The problem is that these tendencies are the exact opposite of what we should be doing if we want to see real improvement, according to Dr. Anders Ericsson. And we might be wise to listen. Dr. Ericsson is widely considered one of the foremost thinkers on the subject of “expertise.” His research is one of the primary sources that inspired Malcolm Gladwell’s now-famous “10,000 Hour Rule” — that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to be an expert in anything. But that rule, though memorable, is far from the whole story.